Hubert (II) de Anstey and the 1196 Siege of Aumale Castle

We know that Hubert (II) de Anstey, son of Richard de Anstey, fought in the 1196 Siege of Aumale Castle, and whilst researching for the fourth edition of ‘ANSTEY: Our True Surname Origin and Shared Medieval Ancestry‘ we have found an entry which can shed further light into this matter. However, we are the firstContinue reading “Hubert (II) de Anstey and the 1196 Siege of Aumale Castle”

Walter D’Anesty and the Tower of London

In the first three editions of ‘ANSTEY: Our True Surname Origin and Shared Medieval Ancestry‘ we briefly documented Walter De Anesty, Clerk of the Exchange at the Royal Mint in 1296 and a member of the medieval Anstey sub-branch descendent from John de Anstey. In footnote 331 of the third edition of our first bookContinue reading “Walter D’Anesty and the Tower of London”

“Willelmus de Anestay” – Anstey Imposter

In ‘ANSTEY: Our True Surname Origin and Shared Medieval Ancestry‘ we discuss ‘Anstey imposters’ and how it is so important that we can successfully recognise and eliminate them from the medieval Anstey story. Sometimes this can be devilishly difficult to do, so we have provided many examples in Appendix Three (‘Notes for Medieval Anstey Researchers’)Continue reading ““Willelmus de Anestay” – Anstey Imposter”

Rev. Martin Anstey’s Old Oak Chest

Over a century ago on 29 April 1911, Rev. Martin Anstey wrote to Tom stating: “Dear Mr Anstey, yours of yesterday to hand I have a good many ancient documents in our old oak chest and some years ago I spent a summer trying to sift them and learn what I could about the originContinue reading “Rev. Martin Anstey’s Old Oak Chest”

“John de Anstygh” 1297 and 1307

In footnote 251 of the third edition of ‘ANSTEY: Our True Surname Origin and Shared Medieval Ancestry‘ we wrote the following: “We have tentatively placed John, who appears in the ‘Cambridge Fines’ for 1332 as “Chaplain in Shepereth and Melreth”, as [Roger’s] descendant in the pedigree on page 169. This is very much a provisionalContinue reading ““John de Anstygh” 1297 and 1307″

Richard de Anstey’s Children (Update)

In the first three editions of ‘ANSTEY: Our True Surname Origin and Shared Medieval Ancestry‘ on pages 93-4 we said that Richard de Anstey had three children, the third being William “who died childless”. This information came from the pedigree in ‘New Light on the Anstey Case’ by P. A. Brand, which we are nowContinue reading “Richard de Anstey’s Children (Update)”

Twillingate, Newfoundland, Canada Ansteys

It has long since been established by other Anstey researchers that the patriarch of the Twillingate, Newfoundland, Canada Ansteys is Charles Anstey of Poole in Dorset, England, who inherited a plantation in Twillingate in the will of William White of Wimborne Minister, Dorset in the 1700s, and thence emigrated there. We are currently attempting toContinue reading “Twillingate, Newfoundland, Canada Ansteys”

Ham, Surrey

In the first three editions of ‘ANSTEY: Our True Surname Origin and Shared Medieval Ancestry‘, we stated that Hubert de Anstey owned Ham in Surrey. Our logic behind this was as follows: a) in 1141 Geoffrey de Mandeville was granted Anstey, Braughing and Ham manors as a package; b) in 1143, Anstey, Hertfordshire was takenContinue reading “Ham, Surrey”

‘Chartulary of St John the Baptist of Colchester (Roxburgh Club)’

At the end of Appendix One of the third edition of ‘ANSTEY: Our True Surname Origin and Shared Medieval Ancestry‘, we wrote: The main source which will either advance, confirm or refute this tentative strand of research [the pre-Anstey ancestral pedigree] is the ‘Chartulary of St John the Baptist of Colchester (Roxburgh Club)’. Eudo theContinue reading “‘Chartulary of St John the Baptist of Colchester (Roxburgh Club)’”