The Silver Bow, Montana Ansteys

by Gary. M. Ansteychief researcher of the Anstey story project.

Overview of the Silver Bow, Montana Ansteys

The Silver Bow, Montana Ansteys of America are a sub-branch of the St Gluvias Ansteys of Cornwall, an ‘Anstey evolved from Anstis‘ sub-branch. Hence they are originally part of the ‘Anstis’ family pedigree, and thus do not connect to the wider Anstey pedigree descendent from Hubert de Anstey. The Silver Bow, Montana Ansteys are headed by Alfred George Anstey (b 1864 Kenwyn), who was later joined in Silver Bow by his younger brother Richard Anstey (b 1876 Truro).

It is very likely that the Silver Bow, Montana Anstey sub-branch is now Anstey-extinct, though research continues into this matter – anybody who has any evidence to the contrary please contact us at research@theansteystory.com.

Alfred George Anstey (b 1864 Kenwyn)

Alfred George Anstey, known sometimes as George, was born in 1864 (some sources say 17 December 1862) in Kenwyn, Cornwall to parents Alfred George Anstey and Elizabeth Coad, baptised 2 November 1864 at St Mary’s Truro as ‘George‘. In the 1871 Census he was living with his family at Pydar Street Boscawen Row, St Mary, Truro (and still referred to as ‘George‘). Alfred George Anstey married Mary Ann Phillips Ball (b 1864), known as Annie, in 1889 in Perranzabuloe (father confirmed as ‘Alfred George Anstey’). The ‘Royal Cornwall Gazette‘ on 4 April 1889 reported “MARRIAGE: ANSTEY—BALL—At Perranzabuloe Parish Church, March 23. Mr. Alfred George Anstey, of Truro, to Miss Annie Ball, of Carnkief, Perranzabuloe“. Alfred George Anstey emigrated to America in 1890, with his wife following him in 1892 (according to the 1900 Census) and they had children in Michigan, Cornwall (where they must have returned temporarily in 1894) and later Butte, Silver Bow, Montana:

  • George Henry Anstey (b 30 September 1892 Iron Mountain, Michigan – the ‘Royal Cornwall Gazette‘ on 27 October 1892 reported “BIRTHS ANSTEY— At Iron Mountain, Michigan, N.A., Sept. 30, the wife of Alfred George Anstey (late of Truro) of a son“. He was living with his family in the 1910 Census then he married Lottie G. Trinniman (b 2 December 1896 Cornwall) at St Paul Methodist Church in Butte Silver Bow on 30 September 1914 and they had a daughter Florence Montana Anstey (b 1915, married Mr Button, alive in 1987). In the June 1917 Draft Registration for World War One, George noted that he was living at 1703 Whitman, Butte with a “wife and child“, and that he was a warehouseman with no previous military experience. In the 1920 Census they were living next door to George‘s parents in Butte where George was a checking clerk. They were still living in Butte in the 1930 and 1940 censuses (living at 1703 Whitman). When his brother Reginald died in 1945, George was still living in Butte. George was buried in Mount Moriah Cemetery, Butte in 1986, gravestone inscription “Father George H. 1892 – 1986 Mother Lottie G. 1896 – 1987 ANSTEY“);
  • Reginald Anstey (b 1894 Goonhavern, Cornwall – an Anstey Hero, see below);
  • Alfred John Anstey (b 26 January 1897 Iron Mountain Michigan, living with family in the 1910 Census. In the June 1918 Draft Registration for World War One, Alfred John Anstey wrote that he was living at 1703 Whitman, Butte and that he was a warehouseman (he also confirmed that his father was born in Truro). He was a truck driver in Butte in the 1920 Census. Alfred John Anstey was still single when he died on 5 December 1924 “crushed by a cage – mine accident” whilst working at Mountain View Mine. He was buried in the same grave as his father – see below);
  • Louise Anna Anstey (b 8 October 1899 Silver Bow, Montana, known as Annie, living with her family in the 1910 Census and a stenographer in Butte in the 1920 Census. She married George W. Pooler in 1938 in Butte and was buried in Mount Moriah Cemetery, Butte in August 1948);
  • Pearl Anstey (b 1904 Butte, Silver Bow, living with her family in the 1910 Census. She married first Vincent Marchiando in Anaconda, Deer Lodge, Montana in 1923 and then later married John Samuel Caddy in 1934 in Deer Lodge, Powell, Montana. Pearl died in 1938 in Montana, buried at Mount Moriah Cemetery, Butte gravestone inscription “Caddy Pearl Anstey 1904 – 1938“); and
  • Angelina Anstey (b 1906, died 1907 of “probably meningitis“).

In the 1900 Census the family was living at Township 5, Silver Bow, Montana where Alfred George Anstey was a miner; he was also naturalised as an American in the same year. By the 1910 American Census they were living at Butte Ward 7, Silver Bow, Montana together with Alfred’s brother Richard Anstey. In 1912 “Alfred George Anstey, miner aged 46, born in England” was on the Montana, County Voting Records in Butte, Silver Bow. In September 1918 the family were living at 1222 George Street (also 1703 Whitman, Butte). In the 1920 Census they were living in Butte Ward 7 – Alfred was still a miner.

Alfred George Anstey died on 21 April 1922 in Silver Bow of “pulmonary tuberculosis, both lungs involved“. He was buried at Mount Moriah Cemetery, Butte with gravestone inscription “Alfred G. Anstey 1862 – 1922 Alfred J. Anstey 1897 – 1924“. His widow Mary Ann Anstey was buried in the same cemetery in 1934, gravestone inscription “Mary Ann Anstey Mother Oct 25 1864 – Dec 15 1934

Richard Anstey (b 1876 Truro)

Richard Anstey was born in 1876 (censuses say anything between 1872 and 1877, though the Draft Registration Card says 2 May 1876 and his death certificate says 1879) in Truro, Cornwall to parents Alfred George Anstey and Elizabeth Coad. He was a “coach builder” in the 1891 Census living with his family in Truro and he was still unmarried and living with his parents in Truro in 1901. At some point before 1910 Richard decided to join his brother Alfred George Anstey in Silver Bow, Montana where in the 1910 American Census he was residing with his brother, working as a miner in a copper mine. In the September 1918 Draft Registration for World War One, Richard wrote that he was born on 2 May 1876; that he was living at 704 Utah? Avenue, Butte, Montana; that he was a miner; and that his nearest relative was his “brother George Anstey at 1222 George Street

In January 1919 Richard Anstey married Gertrude Andrews in Butte, Silver Bow and in the 1920 Census they were living together in Butte Ward 8, where ‘Richard R. Anstey‘ was still a copper miner.

Richard Anstey died on 14 March 1922 at St James Hospital in Butte, as a result of “shock and internal injuries sustained by falling through an opening in the flooring – mine accident” whilst working at Mountain View Mine. He was living at 702 S. Main Street at the time. He was buried at Mt Moriah Cemetery, gravestone inscription “Richard Anstey 1878 – 1922“.

Reginald Anstey (b 1894 Goonhavern, Cornwall)

Reginald Anstey was born in Goonhavern, Perranzubuloe, Cornwall on 9 November 1894, baptised 20 August 1895 at Wesleyan Methodist, Perranwella to parents Alfred George Anstey and Mary Ann Phillips Ball. Even though he was born in Cornwall, he grew up in Butte Silver Bow, Montana, living in Butte Ward 7 in the 1910 American Census. The ‘Butte Daily Post‘ on 23 March 1912 reported “For Mr Reginald Anstey: A Delightful surprise was given to Reginald Anstey at his home 1703 Fourth Avenue on Monday evening. Games were played and light luncheon were served. Those present were …Annie Anstey, Pearl Anstey…Alfred Anstey, George Anstey and the host“.

In the June 1917 Draft Registration for World War One, Reginald wrote that he was living at 1703 Whitman Avenue, Butte with the rest of his family, with no previous military experience.

Soon after this, on 5 November 1917 Reginald enlisted in the American Army at Butte City as a Private (1st Class), “joining by assignment on original draft Nov 9 1917” to serve during World War One. He was posted to:

  • ’65th Company 17th Battalion of the 166th Depot Brigade’ until 5 January 1918;
  • He was then transferred to ‘Company ‘D’ 115th Engineers’ at 40th Division Camp Kearney, Linda Vista, California (a mobilisation and training facility for troops on their way to Europe);
  • He then “served overseas from 8 August 1918 to 29 June 1919” with ‘Company ‘D’ 115th Engineers’

According to the ‘115th Engineers’ Facebook pageIn the summer of 1918 the 115th Engineers Battalion was reorganised into a Regiment of Engineers at Camp Kearny, California, sailing for Europe on 7 August 1918. Landing first in England and then crossing to France the Regiment moved into the area of Neronded, Department of Cher. Throughout the remainder of the war the 115th supported the front line combat units by maintaining lines of communication and supply to the front. Working often with whatever materials were available the Regiment distinguished itself by its devotion to duty and successful completion of difficult jobs. They returned to America in June 1919 and mustered out…

Reginald was honourably discharged from service on 10 July 1919 on demobilisation, without suffering any injuries. By the 1920 Census he was living back in Butte, Silver Bow, working as a miner; ditto the 1930 Census where he was still unmarried and living with his widowed mother in Butte. By the 1940 Census, Reginald was living in Butte with his cousin George James – both of them were “mining in copper mines“.

Reginald died on 5 April 1945 of “coronary occlusion” and “pneumonia“, having never married. He was described in the ‘Death Index‘ as a “soldier [rank] Private 1st Class [with] Co ‘D’ 115 Engineers” and a “veteran of World War One“. At the time of his death, he was working as a ‘surface motorman’ – informant to the death was his brother George H. Anstey. Reginald was buried in Mount Moriah Cemetery, Butte – the gravestone inscription reads “Reginald Anstey 1894 – 1945“.

Further Details on the Silver Bow, Montana Ansteys

We are actively on the lookout for Silver Bow, Montana Anstey experts alive today who are willing to add their findings and knowledge to this project. We are particularly interested in research regarding Silver Bow, Montana Ansteys who fought in World War One, preferably with personal souvenirs such as letters sent by the soldiers or military photos etc. 

Anybody who has such expertise and inclination, please contact us at research@theansteystory.com.

We have already uploaded bits of information and documentation about the Silver Bow, Montana Ansteys, and continue to upload more all the time (see Project Updates), however it is spread over various segments of the website.

The best way to find said information is to enter ‘Silver Bow’ in the search box at the bottom of this page and a list of relevant pages will appear.

Anybody who finds any mistakes on this page, please contact us at research@theansteystory.com and we will correct it.

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