The St Luke, Holborn Ansteys

by Gary. M. Ansteychief researcher of the Anstey story project.

Overview of the St Luke, Holborn Ansteys

The St Luke, Holborn Ansteys of London are a sub-branch of the CreditonAnstey Evolved from Anstis‘ sub-branch. Hence they are originally part of the ‘Anstis’ family, and thus do not connect to the wider Anstey pedigree descendent from Hubert de Anstey. The patriarch of the St Luke, Holborn Ansteys is James Anstey (b 1811 Exeter) who moved to London with his family in c1840.

James Anstey (b 1811 Exeter)

James Anstey was born in Exeter in 1811, surely the son of William Anstey and Jane Bond (and definitely grandson of William Anstis and Elizabeth Lake). James Anstey married Elizabeth Mayne Ingram in 1832 in Exeter and they had children in Exeter and later London:

  • Mary Ann Lake Anstey (b 1833 Exeter, a housemaid in St Luke in 1851);
  • Elizabeth Jane Anstey (b 1836 Exeter St Paul, a housemaid in St Luke in 1851);
  • William Ingram Anstey (b 1837 Exeter, died before 1841?);
  • James Ingram Anstey (b 1839 Exeter, became a drapers assistant, appears never to have married and was living in High Street, St Nicholas, Greenwich in the 1891 Census);
  • Georgina [or Selina] Anstey (b 1842 Kensington);
  • William Anstey (b 1844 Aldgate – see below);
  • Thomas Anstey (b 1846 St Botolph Aldgate – see below);
  • Alfred Anstey (b 1849 St Luke, a machine boy in 1861 in St Luke and an ink maker in St Luke in 1871);
  • John Anstey (b 1853, St Luke, a porter in St Luke in 1871. He married Elizabeth Cotter in Bethnal Green in 1876 and they had a daughter Elizabeth Selina Anstey (b 1878 Hackney, married in 1904 in Islington). In the 1881 Census John was a printers packer living at 1, Phenix Place, St Luke, Holborn. A year later John died aged 28 in ‘City of London’ so by 1891 his widow and daughter were living at Milton Grove, Islington. In the 1901 Census they were both laundresses at 50, Elthorne Road, Islington. In the 1911 Census Elizabeth Anstey (widow) was a domestic servant at 32 Wallingford Avenue North Kensington)

James Anstey was a joiner and carpenter. By the 1841 Census he was living at Edgware Road, Marylebone, a “carpenter“. By 1851 the family had arrived in St Luke, Holborn, living at Blands Buildings, Saint Luke, and by 1861 they were living at 19 Radcliffe Grove, St Luke (throughout this time James Anstey was a “carpenter, born in Exeter in 1811“). James Anstey died in 1884; his wife Elizabeth predeceased him in 1879.

William Anstey (b 1844 Aldgate)

William Anstey was born in 1844 in Aldgate, East London to parents James Anstey and Elizabeth Ingram. In the 1861 Census he was a “gas tube rubber” in St Luke living with his family. He married Eliza Cook (1847-1922) in 1864 in Shoreditch and they had children in St Luke (and later Shoreditch):

  • William Anstey (b 1866 – see below);
  • Alfred Ingram Anstey (b 1867 – see below);
  • Charlotte Anstey (b 1869, an examiner of stationary in the 1891 Census in Shoreditch – she died in 1914);
  • John Anstey (b 1871 St Luke, a copper plate printer in the 1891 Census in Shoreditch. He married Marion Louise Rayner in 1893 in Shoreditch and in the 1901 Census they were living at Mitchells Cottages, 5, Walthamstow, West Ham with their children Lillian Anstey (b 1895 Hackney, known as Lilly, alive in 1911); Marion Anstey (b 1897 Hoxton, known as Marie, alive in 1911); and John Anstey (b 1899 Walthamstow – see below) – John was still a “copper plate printer“. They also had children Violet Anstey (b 1902 Walthamstow, alive in 1911) and Victoria Alexandra Anstey (b 3 September 1905 Hackney, living with family in the 1911 Census. She married Eric Harvey Tabb on 25 October 1937 in Jersey and in 1941 she was living at 4, Malakoff Place, First Tower, St Helier, Jersey). John was still a copper plate printer in the 1911 Census when the family were living at Gladstone Buildings Willow Street Finsbury E C, Shoreditch);
  • Eliza Anstey (b 1873, a postcard counter in the 1891 & 1901 Censuses in Shoreditch – she died in 1962);
  • Reuben Anstey (b 1876 St Luke – an Anstey Hero);
  • Frederick Albert Anstey (b 1879, a compositor in the 1901 Census in Herbert Street, Shoreditch and a “composite printer” in the 1911 Census in Sherringham Avenue, Tottenham. In all four Censuses (1881, 1891, 1901 and 1911) his birth location was given as ‘St Lukes‘. It is probably Frederick who embarked for Portland, Ontario in Canada in the ship ‘Cymric‘ on 7 May 1913 “F. A. Anstey a 34 year old compositor intending to reside in Canada“. Frederick probably married Eliza Racher in 1922 in Wandsworth and died Woolwich in 1955 “aged 74” – though we seek verification fo this);
  • Florence Anstey (b 1881 Hoxton, Shoreditch, a stationers clerk in Shoreditch in the 1901 Census);
  • Garnet Anstey (b 1882 Hoxton, Shoreditch – an Anstey Hero); and
  • Ernest Anstey (b 1885 Hoxton, Shoreditch – an Anstey Hero)

In the 1871 Census the family were living at 16 Radcliffe Grove, St Luke, three doors down from William Anstey’s parents – William Anstey was an envelope cutter. In the 1881 Census they were living at Gopsall Street, Shoreditch – William Anstey was a stationer. By the 1891 Census they were living at Forston Street, Shoreditch – William Anstey was still an envelope cutter. By the 1901 Census they were living at Herbert Street Shoreditch and in the 1911 Census they were living at 44 Sherringham Avenue Tottenham together with a grandchild Nellie [Eleanor] Anstey (b 1895 Shoreditch/Hoxton, who was also living with them in 1901 – she was daughter of their son William Anstey) – William Anstey (father) was retired. William Anstey died in 1914.

Thomas Anstey (b 1846 Aldgate)

Thomas Anstey was born in 1846 in St Botolph, Aldgate, East London to parents James Anstey and Elizabeth Ingram. He was a shop man in 1861 in St Luke and then he married Eliza Hart in Shoreditch in 1863. They had children in and around St Luke:

  • Thomas William Anstey (b 1864 St Luke, mother confirmed as ‘Hart’ – in the 1911 Census he was an unmarried stoker serving time at H M Prison Heathfield Road Wandsworth);
  • William Anstey (b 1866);
  • John Anstey (b c1867 – see below);
  • Charles Anstey (b 1871, married Minnie Margaret Roberts in 1890 in Holborn. In the 1901 Census they were living at 74, Gee Street, St Luke, Holborn – Charles Anstey was a meat packer. They had children in St Luke, Minnie Amelia Anstey (b 1891, died 1892); Eliza Anstey (b 1893, died 1894); Charles Anstey (b 1896, died an infant); Rose Amelia Anstey (b 1899); William Anstey (b 1903); John Frederick Anstey (b 1904, died 1905); and Charles W. Anstey (b 1908). In the 1911 Census Charles Anstey was a hawker of fruit, living with his family at 18 Bastwick Street, St Luke);
  • Eliza Anstey (b 1875);
  • Richard Anstey (b 1879, living with his widowed mother in 1891. He became a “habitual criminal” appearing frequently in court in London and prison for various misdeeds. In 1894 he was jailed for 21 days for stealing boots. Then in 1897 whilst a “labourer aged 18 born in London” he was found guilty of larceny (stealing a watch, chain and seal of William Pike) and sentenced to 18 months hard labour. In 1900 he was sentenced to 3 years jail for stealing a locket. In the 1901 Census he was a convict at the Portland Convict Establishment in Weymouth. In 1904 he was sentenced to 3 years for stealing a watch. In 1908 he was sentenced to 22 months for stealing boots. In 1911 he was sentenced to 18 months for breaking and entering. According to the ‘Illustrated Police News‘ 16 April 1914 edition “A Stabbing Charge: A Man With a Bad Record Sent For Trial. Richard Anstey, 32 , a labourer of no fixed abode, was charged before Mr Clarke Mall at Old Street Police Court with stabbing Annie Rumble with some sharp instrument with intent to cause her grievous bodily harm“. ‘The Vote‘ 22 May 1914 edition added “Clerkenwell: On Wednesday, April 23, Richard Anstey was sentenced by Mr. Justice Laurie to three years’ penal servitude for maliciously wounding Mary Ann Rumble. The couple had lived together until Anstey was sent to prison for stealing. When released he tried to make rumble continue their relations. On her refusal he pestered and assaulted her. The severity of the sentence was due no doubt to the prisoners previous criminal record“); and
  • Elizabeth Anstey (b 1885 Clerkenwell)

In the 1871 Census, the family was living at Graham Street, Islington – Thomas Anstey was a “rag sorter” and a “Mary Hart” (presumably related to Eliza) was living with them. By 1881 they were living at 9, Clark Street, Clerkenwell, Holborn, Thomas Anstey was still a “rag sorter“. Thomas Anstey died in Islington in 1890.

In the 1891 Census Eliza Anstey (widow) and a charwoman, was living at 1 New Court, St Luke with her children Eliza (a “polisher“), Richard and Elizabeth. Eliza Anstey (widow) was still there in the 1901 Census with her youngest daughter Elizabeth (a “french polisher“), living three doors down from her son John Anstey and his family.

William Anstey (b 1866 St Luke)

William Anstey was born in 1866 in St Luke to parents William Anstey and Eliza Cook. He married Mary Ann Ryan in Holborn in 1885 and then after she died in 1896 in Shoreditch he remarried Sarah Matilda Hastings (b 1869 Bethnal Green) later in 1896 in Bethnal Green. They had children in Shoreditch and later Islington:

  • William Anstey (b 1886 Hoxton, Shoreditch to mother ‘Ryan’, a pen maker in Islington in 1901 and an engineer in Islington in the 1911 Census);
  • John Anstey (b 3 May 1888 Hoxton, Shoreditch to mother ‘Ryan’ an Anstey Hero – not to be confused with John Anstey born in 1888 in St Luke to mother ‘Dimmock’ per below);
  • Mary Ann Anstey (b 1890 Shoreditch to mother ‘Ryan’, died an infant?)
  • Ernest Anstey (b 1 June 1891 Hoxton, Shoreditch to mother ‘Ryan’ – an Anstey Hero);
  • Alfred Anstey (b 1893 Hoxton, Shoreditch, a station porter in Islington in the 1911 Census);
  • Eleanor Anstey (b q4 1895 Shoreditch to mother ‘Ryan’, known as Nellie, living with her grandparents William Anstey and Eliza Cook in the 1901 and 1911 Census)
  • Henry Anstey (b 1897 Islington – an Anstey Hero);
  • George Anstey (b 1898 Islington to mother ‘Hastings’);
  • Elsie Anstey (b 1899 Islington to mother ‘Hastings’, died an infant?);
  • Florence Eliza Anstey (b 1901 Islington to mother ‘Hastings’); and
  • Albert Anstey (b 1902 Islington)

[Research Note: We know that this William Anstey was son of William Anstey and Eliza Cook rather than son of his brother Thomas Anstey and Eliza Hart because a) he lived in Shoreditch (like his family), b) he was a box cutter (like his father) c) his son was a pen maker (like his siblings), d) he named a son ‘Ernest‘ (same as his brother), and e) his daughter Eleanor [Nellie] was living with her grandparents in 1901 and 1911.]

In the 1891 Census William Anstey and his wife Mary were living at Bristow Street, Shoreditch, he was a box cutter. By the 1901 Census the family were living at Edinborough Cottages, 82, Islington – William Anstey was a box cutter and he was living with his second wife Sarah. By the 1911 Census the family were living at 71 Edinboro Cottages Popham. William Anstey died in 1917.

Alfred Ingram Anstey (b 1867 St Luke)

Alfred Ingram Anstey was born in 1867 in St Luke to parents William Anstey and Eliza Cook. He married Louisa Long in Bethnal Green in 1887 and they had children in and around Bethnal Green:

  • Alfred George Anstey (b 1887 Hoxton);
  • Richard Anstey (b 1889 St Luke – an Anstey Hero)
  • Alexander Anstey (b 1889 Bethnal Green, married Rachel Sarah Caddy in 1920 in Bethnal Green. They were living in Bethnal Green in 1921 and he died in 1929 in Romford – it is just possible that Alexander Anstey is the same person as Richard Anstey, though we have no evidence for that);
  • Louisa Florence Anstey (b 1891 St Luke, a stationers assistant in 1911 in Bethnal Green);
  • Florence Anstey (b 1894 Bethnal Green, known as Florrie, a stationers assistant in 1911 in Bethnal Green);
  • Edith Anstey (b 1896 Bethnal Green, a “steel worker staysin 1911 in Bethnal Green);
  • William Anstey (b 1897 Bethnal Green – an Anstey Hero);
  • Edward John Anstey (b 1899 Bethnal Green – an Anstey Hero);
  • Rose Anstey (b 1900 Bethnal Green, living with her family in the 1911 Census);
  • Ernest Anstey (b 1903 Bethnal Green, died an infant);
  • Herbert Anstey (b 1906 Bethnal Green, living with her family in the 1911 Census); and
  • Nellie Anstey (b 1907 Bethnal Green, living with her family in the 1911 Census)

In the 1891 Census the family were living at Abbey Street, Bethnal Green. In the 1901 Census they were at 32, Charlotte Street, Bethnal Green; in 1905 they were living at 10 Cymon Street, Bethnal Green; and in the 1911 Census they were at 16 Centre Street, Bethnal Green – Alfred Anstey was a “printer copper plate” throughout these censuses. By 1916 the family were living at 3 North Street, Mare Street, Hackney. Alfred Ingram Anstey died in December 1934 in Brentford.

John Anstey (b c1867 St Luke)

Note: This ‘John Anstey‘ should not be confused with another ‘John Anstey‘ above, born in 1871 in St Luke (a copper plate printer son of William Anstey (b 1844))

John Anstey was born in c1867 (though later censuses indicate a c1871 birth) to parents Thomas Anstey and Eliza Hart. He married Ann Dimmock (b c1869 London, known as Annie) in c1887 and they had children in St Luke:

  • John Anstey (b 5 September 1888 to mother ‘Dimmock’ – an Anstey Hero, not to be confused with John Anstey born 1888 in Hoxton to mother ‘Ryan’ per above);
  • Hannah Annie Anstey (b 1890 to mother ‘Dimmock’, , living with her family in the 1911 Census);
  • William Anstey (b 1892 to mother ‘Dimmock’, living with his family in the 1911 Census);
  • Elizabeth A. Anstey (b 1894);
  • Eliza Anstey (b 1897 to mother ‘Dimmock’, living with her family in the 1911 Census)

In the 1891 Census the family were living at 4, New Court, London, St Luke, Holborn. John Anstey was a “shoe black, born 1871 St Luke“. They were still there in 1901, living three doors down from John‘s mother Eliza Anstey (widow) and his youngest sister Elizabeth.

Here matters get somewhat murky because in 1906 John Anstey (son) wrote that his mother Annie Anstey and three of his younger siblings William, Annie and Laura were living at 165 Seward Street Buildings St Luke. We further believe that in the 1911 Census the family were living at 317 Bartholomew Buildings Goswell Road E C, St Luke. However certain aspects of the 1911 Census do not fit and others do. For example in the 1911 Census:

  • John Anstey (father) has ‘become’ Joseph Anstey (b 1873 Bethnal Green, a french polisher) – however the name ‘Joseph‘ was added afterwards to the Census;
  • Joseph Anstey‘ and Annie had been married 23 years which fits perfectly with the birth of ‘John Anstey‘ and Annie‘s first child John Anstey (1888)
  • Joseph Anstey‘ and Annie had 9 children together, of which 6 were still living, which fits approximately with our combined ‘Joseph Anstey/ John Anstey‘ tally
  • Annie Anstey (mother) appears in the Census approximately correct;
  • William Anstey (b 1892) appears in the Census approximately correct;
  • Hannah Anstey (daughter) appears in the Census with a birth year five years from her birth (1895 instead of 1890)
  • Eliza Anstey (b 1897) appears in the Census approximately correct;
  • Goswell Road and Seward Street are adjacent streets in St Luke

If we are correct here (ie that ‘John Anstey‘ and ‘Joseph Anstey‘ are the same person), and we do need to resolve the issues in the 1911 Census before we can be certain, then John/Joseph and Ann Dimmock also had children in St Luke:

  • Laura Anstey (b ?);
  • Joseph Frederick S. Anstey (b 1902 – his father was confirmed as ‘Joseph Anstey‘ of 9 Waterloo Street St Luke in 1920 when he signed up for the Royal Artillery. He was living with his family in the 1911 Census); and
  • Edward Simmond Anstey (b 1909, known as Teddy, living with his family in the 1911 Census. He was a metal polisher in Islington in the 1939 Register married to Florence Edith Brattle, who he married in 1938 in Southwark. He died in 1989 in Islington.)

All should become clearer when the 1921 Census is released – until then the above must be considered tentative.

John Anstey (b 1899 Walthamstow)

John Anstey was born in 1899 in Walthamstow to parents John Anstey and Marion Louise Rayner. He was living with his family at 116 Gladstone Buildings, Willow Street, Finsbury, Shoreditch in the 1911 Census. We believe that this ‘John Anstey‘ is an Anstey Hero, serving during World War One as a Private with the Royal Fusiliers (Service Number: 351961) and then the 9th Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (Service Number: 44158). All we know of his service is that in ‘The Gazette‘ Issue 31405 on 13 or 17 June 1919 appears “Military Medal. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Military Medal for bravery in the Field…. J. Anstey Hoxton Private 44158 9th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers“.

As to why we believe it must be this ‘John Anstey‘, it is a process of elimination because the other three ‘John Anstey‘ living in or around Hoxton/Shoreditch at that time were John Anstey (b 1888 Hoxton); John Anstey (b 1888 St Luke); and John William Anstey (b 1892 Hoxton) and we have already documented their war stories.

Anybody who can confirm or disprove this conclusion please contact us at research@theansteystory.com.

Further Details on the St Luke, Holborn Ansteys

#1. Henry and Charlotte Anstey, who were living at Bunhill Row, St Luke, Holborn in the 1871 Census, are of the Castle Cary Ansteys.

#2. A George Ansty, born 1875 in St Luke, signed up for service with the Army (7th Battalion Rifle Brigade Service Number: 4669) on 27 February 1895 aged 20 and church of England by religion. He was working as a porter for a butchers and residing at No 1 Middle Court, Middle Row, Old London. However he was discharged a few days later on 14 March 1895 “unfit for service due to cardiac disease“. We cannot currently place this gentleman as we cannot find any other details.

We are actively on the lookout for St Luke, Holborn Anstey experts alive today who are willing to add their findings and knowledge to this project. We are particularly interested in research regarding St Luke, Holborn Ansteys who fought in World War One, preferably with personal souvenirs such as letters sent by the soldiers or military photos etc. 

Anybody who has such expertise and inclination, please contact us at research@theansteystory.com.

We have already uploaded bits of information and documentation about the St Luke, Holborn Ansteys, and continue to upload more all the time (see Project Updates), however it is spread over various segments of the website.

The best way to find said information is to enter ‘St Luke, Holborn’ in the search box at the bottom of this page and a list of relevant pages will appear.

Anybody who finds any mistakes on this page, please contact us at research@theansteystory.com and we will correct it.

%d bloggers like this: