The Aylesbury Anstees

by Gary. M. Ansteychief researcher of the Anstey story project.

The Aylesbury Anstees (including Lower Winchendon and Bierton) of Buckinghamshire are very likely all members of the Swanbourne Ansteys, though we are still searching for some formal connections. Aylesbury lies about ten miles south of Swanbourne.

Note: This page is very much work-in-progress, being mainly a set of unlinked clues!

#1. The first we see of Anstees in Aylesbury is when Joannah Anstee married William Swannell in 1763 (Joannah was likely born in Swanbourne in 1741 to father “Jos[eph] Anstee“, Joannah being a rare ‘Swanbourne Anstee‘ name). We also find Elizabeth Anstey (transcribed ‘Hanstey‘) married William Pearson in 1780 in Aylesbury.

#2. The only early Anstee family that we find settled in Aylesbury was John Anstee who married Elizabeth Rolles in November 1769 in Aylesbury. They had children in Aylesbury:

  • Mary Anstee (b 1770 to John Anstee a ‘baker’, died an infant);
  • Elizabeth Anstee (b c1770, likely baptised as an adult in 1788, married John Plater in 1787 in Lower Winchendon. She had died by 1810 and is mentioned in her mother’s 1810 will – see below);
  • William Anstee (b 1771, buried in Swanbourne in August 1793, he was a “dairyman from Aylesbury“);
  • Mary Anstee (b c1772, likely baptised as an adult in 1788, married William East in 1792 in Lower Winchendon. She is mentioned as being alive in her mother’s 1810 will – see below);
  • Molly Anstee (b 1780, married William King, a carpenter, in Aylesbury in 1801);
  • Hannah Anstee (b ? buried in Aylesbury in 1807 “a spinster“)

John Anstee was a baker, he took apprentices Charles Keep in 1783 and John Groves in 1785; he appears as an Elector (again a baker) in the borough of Aylesbury in 1804. There is confusion regarding John Anstee‘s wife Elizabeth Anstee because we have firstly that she left a will written September 1809 and proved June 1810, which mentioned her being “Elizabeth Anstee of Nether Winchendon, widow” (the will also mentions her daughters Mary East and Elizabeth Plater and their children – William Bullgentleman” and Thomas Plater were executors – see National Archives reference ‘PROB 11/1512/36‘). Secondly however we have burial for Elizabeth Anstee in Aylesbury on 8 December 1811 “wife of John Anstee“.

#3. In 1818 John Anstee a “bachelor of Swanbourne” married Mary Hitchcock of Aylesbury in Aylesbury. Then in 1820 Thomas Anstee of “St Paul, Covent Garden, Middlesex” married Sarah Ivatts of Aylesbury in Aylesbury.

#4. In 1846, George Anstee (b 1820 Swanbourne, a bricklayers labourer) married Mary Ann Olliffe (b 1827 in Aylesbury) in Aylesbury, they were living in Aylesbury in the 1851 Census. George Anstee died in Aylesbury in 1875.

#5. Elizabeth Anstee was baptised in June 1768 in Lower Winchendon to father Joseph Anstee. She was a servant in Aylesbury, convicted in the Buckinghamshire Quarter Sessions on 10 October 1805 and sentenced to 7 years for an unknown petty crime. She was transported to Sydney Cove in Australia in January 1807, arriving 18 June 1807 (see Anstey Convicts Sent to Australia for more on this lady).

We are actively on the lookout for Aylesbury Anstee experts alive today who are willing to add their findings and knowledge to this project. We are particularly interested in research regarding Aylesbury Anstees who fought in World War One, preferably with personal souvenirs such as letters sent by the soldiers or military photos etc. Anybody who has such expertise and inclination, please contact us at research@theansteystory.com.

We have already uploaded bits of information and documentation about the Aylesbury Anstees, and continue to upload more all the time (see Project Updates), however it is spread over various segments of the website.

The best way to find said information is to enter ‘Aylesbury’ in the search box at the bottom of this page and a list of relevant pages will appear.

Anybody who finds any mistakes on this page, please contact us at research@theansteystory.com and we will correct it.

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