The Newport Pagnell Anstees

by Gary. M. Ansteychief researcher of the Anstey story project.

Overview of the Newport Pagnell Anstees

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘.

Early Newport Pagnell Anstees

  • 1559: on 13 November both Thomas Ansten and wyfe of Thomas Ansten were buried
  • 1560: John Anstey married Agnes Rydgedale
  • 1562: Thomas A [possibly Anstey] born to father John A.
  • 1608: on 22 June George Anstee married Harriet Catesby (in Hardmead)
  • 1630: Francis Ansten buried
  • 1676: Jane baptised to father George Ansteed
  • 1679: Rebecca baptised to father George Ansteed
  • 1681: George Anstee and his son John were both buried
  • 1681: John baptised to father George Anste

Joseph Anstee (b c1680?)

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘.

Joseph Anstee had a son Joseph Anstee who married in 1737 per below.

Daniel Anstee (b c1695?)

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘.

Daniel and his daughter Mary are mentioned in the 1753 will of Daniel‘s cousin Sarah AnsteeOctober 1753: The will of Sarah Anstee widow of Hanslope reads “In the Name of God Amen I Sarah Anstee of Hanslop in the County of Bucks Widow being of sound mind memory and understanding praised be God for the same Do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following (that is to say) first and principally I Give and recommend my Soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it And my body to the Earth to be decently buried at the discretion of my Executrix hereinafter named And as touching such worldly Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me with I dispose thereof as followeth First I Give and bequeath to my Nephew Henry Walker of Hanslop aforesaid the Sum of Thirty pounds of Good and lawful money of Great Britain Also I Give and bequeath to my Niece Elizabeth Harris of Hanslop aforesaid the sum of Ten pounds of like lawful money Also I Give and bequeath unto my Nephews Robert Walker and Thomas Walker of Hanslop aforesaid the sum of Ten pounds apiece of like lawful money Also I Give and bequeath unto John Gadsdon of Emmerton in the said County of Bucks the Sum of Ten pounds of like lawfull money Also I Give and bequeath to Mary the Daughter of my Cousin Daniel Anstee of Newport Pagnell in the County of Bucks the Sum of Ten pounds of like lawfull money Also I Give and bequeath unto my Niece Elizabeth Gadsdon of Hanslop aforesaid the Sum of Ten pounds of like lawfull money And to my said Niece Elizabeth Gadsdon all my Household Goods And to my said Nieces Elizabeth Gadsdon and Elizabeth Harris all my rings and wearing apparel equally between them share and share alike Lastly all the rest residue and remainder of my Estate both real and personal and of what nature or kind soever I Give and bequeath unto my Nephew Robert Gadsdon of Newport pagnell aforesaid he paying the above Legacies by me bequeathed and all my just Debts and funeral Expences And I make and ordain my said Cousin Robert Gadsdon sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking and making void all former and other Wills by me heretofore made And declare this and no other to be my last Will and Testament In Witness whereof I have to this my last Will and Testament set my hand and Seal this Sixteenth of October and in the year of our Lord 1753 – The Mark of Sarah Anstee Signed Sealed Published and declared by the said Sarah Anstee the Testatrix as and for her last Will and Testament in the presence of us who have subscribed our names as Witnesses hereto and in her presence at her request – Witnesses – Charles Pantor – John Ratnett – Jane Wharton her Mark Proved the 22nd Day Of April 1754

Joseph Anstee (m 1737 Astwood)

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘.

In 1737, Joseph Anstee, very likely the son of Joseph Anstee, married Sarah Allebone [Allibone] in Astwood, both were of Newport Pagnell (Joseph was a baker) and they had children in Newport Pagnell:

Joseph Anstee (b c1737 Newport Pagnell)

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘.

Joseph Anstee was born in c1737 to father Joseph Anstee. In 1775 he married Ann Naisby in Newport Pagnell. They had children:

Joseph Anstee was buried in Newport Pagnell in 1822, the burial entry giving his birth year as 1736.

James Kilby Anstee (b 1779 Newport Pagnell)

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘.

James Kilby Anstee was born in 1779 in Newport Pagnell to parents Joseph Anstee and Ann Naisby. He married Sarah Row in Newport Pagnell on 17 November 1800 and they had children in Newport Pagnell:

  • Sarah Anstee (b 1801);
  • Ann Anstee (b 1804);
  • Mary Anstee (b 1807, died 1811);
  • Joseph Anstee (b 1810 – see below);
  • James Anstee (b 1815, buried in Newport Pagnell on 28 November 1841); and
  • Thomas Anstee (b 1817 – see below)

James Kilby Anstee probably died in Newport Pagnell in 1846.

Joseph Anstee (b 1810 Newport Pagnell)

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘.

Joseph Anstee was born in Newport Pagnell in 1810 to parents James Kilby Anstee and Sarah Row. He married Mary (b c1810 Northampton) in c1834 and they had children:

  • Lucy Anstee (b 1835 Southam, alive in 1851);
  • Thomas Anstee (b 1837 Southam, an engine cleaner in 1851);
  • William Anstee (b 1839 Southam or Wolverton – see ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘., married Elizabeth Hammond in 1872 in Newport Pagnell and they had children Lucy Anstee (b 1873 Newport Pagnell, alive in 1881 – still alive in 1911?); William Hammond Anstee (b 1873 Newport Pagnell, died an infant); Joseph Anstee (b 1874 Nantwich, died an infant); Florence Anstee (b 1875 Nantwich, died in 1884); Elizabeth Jane Anstee (b 1877 Nantwich, alive in 1881 – still alive in 1911?); Susan Anstee (b 1879 Crewe, married Albert Edward Jackson on 25 December 1899 in Wistaston); Rosina [Rose] Anstee (b 1881 Crewe – still alive in 1911?); and Thomas Anstee (b 1885 Nantwich, died in 1886). In 1881 William was an engine boiler maker living with his family at 34, Alton Street, Monks Coppenhall. In the 1891 Census William was a boiler maker living with his family at Alton Street, Coppenhall Monks, Nantwich, ditto 1901, and by the 1911 Census he was a “retired boiler maker” living with his wife at 226 Alton Street West Crewe. William Anstee died in Nantwich in 1924);
  • Jane Anstee (b 1843 Wolverton, alive in 1851); and
  • James Anstee (b 1845 Wolverton – see ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘., probably first married Mary (b 1844, who died in Nantwich in 1877). He was a widower living with his mother Mary Anstee at 73, Thomas Street, Monks Coppenhall, Nantwich in the 1881 Census. He married Susan (b 1843 Wynbury) in 1882 in Nantwich and they were living at 38, Manchester Street, Monks Coppenhall, Nantwich in the 1901 Census where he was a general labourer. By the 1911 Census James Anstee was a labourer on the railways living with his wife at 51 Thomas Street Crewe – they had no children. James Anstee died in 1924 in Nantwich)

In 1845 “George Marshall was indicted for stealing pair of shoes on the September, at the parish of Wolverton, the property of Joseph Anstee. The charge was satisfactorily proved against the prisoner, and the Court sentenced nim to 11 days hard labour“. In the 1851 Census Joseph was a post boy living with his family at 356, Cook Street, Wolverton, Potterspury. By the 1881 Census Mary Anstee was a widow, living with her son James Anstee in Nantwich – she died a year later in 1882 in Nantwich.

Thomas Anstee (b 1817 Newport Pagnell)

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘.

Thomas Anstee was born in Newport Pagnell in 1817, baptised 16 May 1817, to parents James Kilby Anstee and Sarah Row. He married Harriet Hewitt [Hewiett] in 1841 in Pottersbury and they had children in Stony Stratford, Potterspury:

  • Charles Anstee (b 1842);
  • James Anstee (b 1844 – see ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘., living at High Street, St Giles in 1861. He likely married Elizabeth Algar (nee Measey) in 1891 in Pottersbury – she had a daughter from a previous marriage Evelyn Lilly Algar (b 1885). James died in 1895 in Buckingham and in the 1901 Census his widow and her daughter were living at Six Lords Inn, Singleborough, Great Horwood where she was an innkeeper and by the 1911 Census they were at High Street Thornborough where she was a wardrobe dealer. The ‘Buckingham Advertiser and Free Press‘ 09 May 1908 reported “Here’s a Thornborough fact. You can test it. Mrs.Elizabeth Anstee, “Lone Tree” Inn, Thornborough, near Buckingham, says:- ” Through a friends recommendation. I commenced a course of Doan’s backache kidney pills and Doan’s dinner pills, and I found they did me more good than any other medicine I had previously taken. For six months I was a martyr to kidney trouble and indigestion and for three days at a time I could scarcely touch a mouthful of food-my chest ached so much that I was really afraid to eat. I seemed to ache all over, but the pains in my sides and back were simply torture. “I tried everything I could think of, and when the pills were recommended to me, I hesitated, for I had given up hope of recovery, But I was agreeably surprised at the end of a week, and by the time I had finished the third box I felt like a different woman; my kidneys were strengthened, the pains left me and I could eat well. Doan’s Backache Kidney Pills and Doan’s Dinner Pills ought to be made known to everyone, for they are excellent. My friend who told me of the pills has also received great benefit from the medicine.” Doan’s Backache Kidney Pills are two shillings and ninepence per box (six boxes for thirteen shillings and ninepence). Doan’s Dinner Pills are one shilling and three half, pence per box (six boxes for six shillings). Of all chemists and stores,or post free direct from Foster-McClellan Co. 8, Wells Street, Oxford Street, London. W, Doan’s are the pills that cured Mrs. Anstee.“);
  • Lucy Anstee (b 1846, died young?);
  • Ann Anstee (b 1848);
  • Frederick Anstee (b 1850, known as Fred – a widower and domestic coachman in the 1911 Census at Pitsford Northampton – there is no indication of any children);
  • Clara Anstee (b 1852 Wolverton, married John Woodward in c1896 and in the 1911 Census she was living with her husband and brother Thomas at 5 Jubilee Terrace Stony Stratford);
  • Thomas Anstee (b 1855, a servant at High Street, St Mary Magdalene, Potterspury in 1871. He married Eliza Henson in Pottersbury in 1885 and in the 1891 Census they were at High Street, Stony Stratford West where Thomas was a coachman. By the 1911 Census Thomas Anstee was a widower and cab driver living with his sister Clara at 5 Jubilee Terrace Stony Stratford); and
  • Harriet Anstee (b 1861)

In the 1851 Census Thomas Anstee was a postboy living at High Street, Stony Stratford West, Potterspury – ditto 1861. By 1871 they were at Church Street, St Giles, Potterspury. Thomas Anstee died in Pottersbury in 1876 – “Death: November 29, Stony Stratford, Mr. Thomas Anstee, (for upwards of 40 years post-boy the Cock Hotel in this town), aged 63 years“.

Further Details on the Newport Pagnell Anstees

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘.

Anybody who finds any mistakes on this page, please contact us at research@theansteystory.com and we will correct them.

%d bloggers like this: