Mark Anstey (DY 44)

See ‘Anstey: A Complete History From the Norman Invasion to World War One‘ for much more on the Dyrham Ansteys. In addition to biographies of various Anstey individuals who make up this sub-branch, the book contains a plethora of Anstey research and statistics, including an analysis of how the Dyrham Ansteys fit into the pedigree descendent from Hubert de Anesti, the 12th century originator of the ‘Anstey’ surname.

DY 44. Mark Anstey: He was born in 1850 in Hanham to father Philip Anstey (DY 23). He went to America with his family in 1857 (see DY 23). The ‘Western Daily Press‘ on 4 March 1869 reported “a young man, named Mark Anstey, St. Philip ‘s, was charged by Earnshaw, the sub-inspector of factories, with a breach of the Factories Act.” A year later “Mark Anstey pleaded guilty to a charge of assaulting Job Jones May 30th“. The ‘Bristol Mercury‘ on 18 February 1871 reported “Mark Anstey, summoned for [support of her illegitimate child] by Elizabeth Harris, was ordered to pay 2s 6d per week and costs”. In the 1871 Census he was living at home working as a labourer at a chemical works. He finally married Elizabeth Harris at Bristol Holy Trinity on 26 November 1871, having additional children in Hanham: 

  • Martha Elizabeth Anstey (b 1873, she married Mr Ford. The ‘Bristol Mercury‘ 25 February 1887 reported “A DEAR KISS, Joseph Cryer, a middle-aged man, was summoned for assaulting Martha Elizabeth Anstey a girl between 13 and 14 years of age, at the Four Pools, Hanham, on the night of Thursday last. The complainant said that the defendant met her on the road, kissed her , and pulled her about. The defendant denied the offence, and called a witness, whose evidence, however, proved that he was in the neighbourhood of the place at the time the assault was alleged to have been committed, The magistrates fined Cryer 40s and costs, or one month’s imprisonment with hard labour.”); 
  • Mary Jane Anstey (b 1874, married Arthur Charles England in 1899 in Bristol, living with her mother in 1911); 
  • Philip Anstey (b 1880, alive and unmarried in 1911 living with his mother. He married Ethel M. Cabble in q2 1918 in Newport and in 1921 they were living at Cosican Blackwood Road, Blackwood, Newport with their children); 
  • Clara Hannah Anstey (b 1882, died 1884); 
  • Henry George Anstey (b 1884, baptised 11 June 1884 Hanham, alive and unmarried in 1911 living with his mother); and 
  • Stanley Jubilee Anstey (b 1887, baptised 6 March 1887 in Hanham. He married Florence E. James in Newport in 1910 and they had at least two children Stanley James Anstey (b 1911, executor to his father’s will in 1959 when he was a mechanical engineer) and Edith Elizabeth Anstey (b 1913 – married William Morris Lewis in 1931 in Eastry). In the 1911 Census they were living at 5 Park Terrace Blackwood, Mynyddislwyn, Monmouthshire and in 1921 they were at 34 William Street, Blackwood, Bedwellty. He died on 30 May 1959 living at 18 Forelands Square, Deal – executors were his son and son in law. He was buried at Hamilton Road Cemetery Hamilton Road Dover, Kent gravestone inscription “Cherished Memories of Florence E. Anstey 1891-1958 Stanley J. Anstey 1887-1959“).

In 1881 the family were living in Hanham where he was a furnaceman at a chemical works. On 30 March 1882 the ‘Bristol Mercury‘ reported “ACCIDENT,-Last evening, a man named Mark Anstey, aged 31 years, and living at Hanham, was admitted as an inpatient at the Royal Infirmary suffering from a severely burnt face. The sufferer is in the employ of the Netham Chemical Works and yesterday evening a shute used to carry chemical preparation suddenly broke while he was passing under it and the contents went over his face“. In the 1901 Census the family were living at Common Road, Hanham Abbots, Keynsham. 

He died in 1904, buried 27 February 1904 at Hanham Christ Church. By the 1911 Census his widow Elizabeth and some of their children (and grandchildren) were living at 19 Gordon Road Blackwood, Bedwellty, Monmouthshire.

Anybody who can add anything to this account, or finds any mistakes on this page, please contact us at research@theansteystory.com.

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